Tag Archives: information gap

Midsummer Day Stonehenge whole lesson plan

Even though it can vary by a day or so Midsummer Day in the northern hemisphere is usually celebrated on June 21st, and one of the oldest places associated with midsummer is the ring of stone monoliths found in the south of England, known as Stonehenge.

This is a whole lesson plan based on the topic of Midsummer Day. There is also an information gap activity where students can learn more about the mysteries of Stonehenge.

This activity is for pre-intermediate – intermediate students, and will take about 45-60 minutes.

Midsummer Day Stonehenge whole lesson plan click here for free downloadable pdf sheets including answer key.

Please find a snapshot of part of the activity below.

Sunrise over Stonehenge on the summer solstice...
Sunrise over Stonehenge on the summer solstice, 21 June 2005 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Stonehenge from the north east in 2006
Stonehenge from the north east in 2006 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Plan of the central Stone Structure at Stonehe...
Plan of the central Stone Structure at Stonehenge as it survives today. Stone numbers are those conventionally used in the recent literature and following Petrie, F. 1880. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Have you ever Present Perfect Simple information gap, duo

An information gap for a pair of students (duo), based on the Present Perfect Simple usage of an experience at some time in the past. The basis is “Have you ever + pp ?” Students are first asked to create their own ‘Have you ever …’ questions. They are assigned a partner, and try to predict their partner’s answers to the questions.¬† Then they ask their partners the questions and see if their predictions are correct. Some students will ask very mundane questions, and others ask totally crazy questions, but it’s all good language practice.

This information gap activity is for elementary to intermediate students and will take about 30/40 minutes.

Have you ever Present Perfect Simple information gap. Click here for free downloadable pdf sheets.

Please find a snapshot of this activity below.

Family Tree information gap

This is an information gap activity for groups of three students, a trio. The biggest difference between this and the conventional paired information gap is that no-one is sure who has the required information. This leads to a new, mysterious  dynamic in the activity, which really spices things up.

This activity is for elementary to intermediate students, and will take about 20/30 minutes.

Family Tree information gap: click here for free downloadable pdf sheets including answer key.

Please find a snapshot of this activity below.

St Patrick’s Day whole lesson

March 17th is not only a day for remembering St Patrick it also a day for celebrating Ireland and its culture, everyone is Irish on St Patrick’s Day.

This is an integrated skills whole lesson plan, consisting of a warm-up, a background reading to St Patrick, an information gap activity, a quiz, and an optional follow-up writng and discussion. It is for pre-intermediate/ intermediate level and will take about 90 minutes.

St Patrick’s Day whole lesson: click here for free downloadable pdf sheets including an answer key.

Please find a snapshot of part of the lesson below.

Present Simple information gap

This is a straightforward information gap activity for a pair of students of elementary level. It takes about 20 minutes. The main focus is using the Present Simple tense in both questions and answers.

There are two steps:

Firstly the students prepare the required questions.

Secondly they ask their questions and record the answers.

Present Simple information gap: click here to find freely downloadable pdf sheets with an answer key.

Please find a snapshot of the activity below.

Valentine’s Day whole lesson

This is a topical whole lesson plan for the celebration of Valentine’s Day on February 14th. It is at a pre-intermediate/intermediate level and will take roughly 1 hour to complete.

Valentine’s Day whole lesson: click here for free downloadable pdf, including answer key.

At first there is a warm-up exercise, followed by a short text giving some of the historical background information to Valentine’s Day.

Then there is an information gap activity involving students in groups of three (trio). Each member of the trio has a slightly (and tantalizingly) different text. This offers a new dynamic to conventional information gap activities in pairs, with an element of doubt as to who really has the required information.

There is also a Valentine’s puzzle to add a light-hearted conclusion to the class, plus an optional writing and discussion activity.

Please find a snapshot of the puzzle below.